Te Hiku Builds A Destination For All

March 22, 2019, 5:51 p.m.

A joint effort between the FNDC and the Te Hiku Community Board including other community groups have come together to complete the 1st stage of a major upgrade to Kaitaia’s Jaycee Centennial Park. The just completed toddlers apparatus in the park is already breathing new life into the park that was once infamous for having “more bark than park.”

Te Hiku Ward Councilor for FNDC, Felicity Foy says “This isn’t just about this park but about revitalising our township”  $52,000 dollars will be used to create a shared cycling and walking tracks through the park that will connect the township of Kaitaia to Jaycee Park including the skatepark, the playground and flow onto Te Ahu Center and eventually onto the Te Hiku Sports Club.

Adele Gardner Chair of the Te Hiku Community Board says she would like to see “Shade sails, drinking fountains, picnic tables, seating, bbq areas, lighting, concrete and wooden paths”.  The Te Hiku Community Board have committed $33,333 from their Placemaking fund and a further $20,000 from the board's other funding sources to the project and are also appealing to local business’ to help sponsor these features that will accommodate to all members of the public and accomplish the full vision of the project.

Foy is passionate about youth having fun and positive things to do in the township and goes on saying that the park is about creating a space for “families to come and spend a day not half an hour.. making this a destination facility for our town.”

Tags: Far North District Council

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